The word “Jeremy” was inadvertently added in square brackets to a quote from Jamie Angus, editor of Radio 4’s Today programme: “He wants to do more with digital and reach younger listeners on social media with ‘[Jeremy] Vine-style six second bits of eclectic Today experience’.” Angus was not referring to the broadcaster Jeremy Vine but to the Vine video-sharing service. The error was made during the editing process.

The Guardian

Monday, July 14, 2014   (Permalink)

In early editions a picture caption on the article Questions abuse inquiry must answer was filled with dummy text: “This is appropriate dummy text that is being employed in order to ascertain an approximate length because the actual copy”. It should have read: “Leon Brittan was home secretary when he was handed a dossier with allegations of child abuse. Photograph: Ben Cawthra/LNP”.

The Guardian

Tuesday, July 8, 2014   (Permalink)

An article on the Guardian’s cities website contained a number of errors. There are not three oil refineries in Tampico; the population of 300,000 is not falling; protesters, calling on the government not to abandon the city to criminals, did not have to avoid shoot-outs and burning cars during their marches in the city and the Cartel del Golfo drugs cartel did not run a front-page announcement in the local newspaper that there would be a curfew in the city. In addition a sentence that suggested the cartels control the newspapers outright was changed to reflect the fact the cartels exert control periodically, killing reporters and editors.

The Guardian

More details available about this massive correction from the Guardian’s reader’s editor.

Tuesday, July 1, 2014   (Permalink)

In a profile of Kerry Taylor in which the senior Viacom executive was talking about offshoots of the reality TV show Geordie Shore, she was wrongly quoted as saying: “We’ve had Warsaw Shore and Gambia Shore.” Taylor was talking about Gandia Shore, set in Spain.

The Guardian

Wednesday, June 25, 2014   (Permalink)

An article about winners of the Queen’s awards for enterprise referred to “artificial preservatives such as ascetic acid”. As a reader pointed out, that would be an acid that denied itself base pleasures. We meant the better known acetic acid.

The Guardian

Tuesday, April 22, 2014   (Permalink)

An agency story about the Vatican recruiting a hawk to protect the pope’s doves after two were killed by a crow and a seagull was deleted from our website because it was discovered to have been an April fools’ joke.

The Guardian

Wednesday, April 16, 2014   (Permalink)

Peaches Geldof’s full name was given as Peaches Michelle Charlotte Angel Vanessa Geldof in an article in Tuesday’s paper. In fact, as she pointed out on Twitter in 2010, she was simply Peaches Honeyblossom Geldof: “The rest of the added names have never been mine.”

The Guardian

Wednesday, April 9, 2014   (Permalink)

The Hebrew joke in a selection from around the world was funnier than intended. As a result of formatting problems in the production process, the Hebrew text appeared the wrong way round.

The Guardian

Wednesday, March 19, 2014   (Permalink)

In the caption on a centre-spread Eyewitness picture showing one of the 10 largest stars found so far (by Earth-dwellers), we erred in saying that it was “One of the 10 biggest objects yet to be found in the solar system”. As a number of readers pointed out, there is only one star in the solar system: the sun.

— The Guardian

Thursday, March 13, 2014   (Permalink)

An online blog about the Oscars said that Bradley Manning took a selfie that included the host Ellen DeGeneres, among others. As the picture shows, it was taken by the actor Bradley Cooper.

The Guardian

Monday, March 3, 2014   (Permalink)

Our failure to use a hyphen in a headline (Guardian named as world’s best designed newspaper) meant that, as one reader pointed out, we may be the world’s best in newspaper design, but not necessarily in punctuation.

The Guardian

Tuesday, February 18, 2014   (Permalink)

The Duchess of Cornwall might have been somewhat surprised to read in an article that she is due to give birth next month. It is the Duchess of Cambridge who is expecting a baby.

The Guardian

Wednesday, June 5, 2013   (Permalink)

The edition numbers printed in the newspaper were one number less than they should have been every day from 29 May to 4 June because the 28 May edition number was inadvertently repeated on 29 May.

The Guardian

Tuesday, June 4, 2013   (Permalink)

The Maori placename Taumatawhakatangihangakoauauotamate aturipukakapikimaungahoronukupokaiwhenua-kitanatahu is not quite as lengthy as we rendered it in a panel accompanying an article about very long words. Our spelling twice included a stray j – a consonant that does not appear in the Maori language.

The Guardian

Tuesday, June 4, 2013   (Permalink)

Because of editing errors, an article on Thursday about a duo that has its first Top 10 single and its first No. 1 album on the Billboard album chart misstated its name at two points. As the article correctly noted elsewhere, it is Daft Punk — not Daft Puck or Daft Pink.

The New York Times

Thursday, May 30, 2013   (Permalink)